Tudor Minute July 25: Happy Anniversary Mary and Philip

Hey, this is Heather from the Renaissance English History Podcast, and this is your Tudor Minute for July 25.

Mary Tudor married Philip of Spain. As we talked about last week, this wound up being a pretty sad marriage, and my heart truly goes out to Mary. She fancied him based on his portrait, while Philip, who was 10 years younger than Mary, saw it more as his duty. Both monarchs agreed that a prime goal was to bring England back into the fold of Catholicism. When they married, Mary was filled with hope and anticipation. At 37, she had now come into her own power, after years of being called a bastard, and having to watch her family fall apart, as she saw it, at the hands of Protestantism.

The description of the marriage from contemporary chronicles is hopeful as well:

“First, the said church was richly hanged with arras and cloth of gold, and in the midst of the church, from the west door unto the rood, was a scaffold erected of timber, at the end whereof was raised a mount, covered all with red say, and underneath the roode-loft were erected two traverses, one for the queen on the right hand, and the other for the prince on the left, which places served very well for the purpose. The quire was allso richly hanged with cloth of gold, and on each side of the altar were other two rich traverses as aforesaid, for the queenes majestie and prince.

On wensday the 25th of July, being St. James’s day, the prince, richly apparelled in cloth of gold, embroidered, with a great company of the nobles of Spayne, in such sort as the like hath not been seen, proceded to the church, and entered in at the west door, and passed to his traverse, all the way on foot; and to the church he had no sword borne before him.

Then came the queenes majesty, accompanied with a great number of the nobility of the realm, the sword being borne before her by the earl of Derby, and a great company of ladyes and gentlewomen very richly apparelled; her majesty’s train was borne up by the marquesse of Winchester, assisted by sir John Gage her lord chamberlayne; and so she pro ceeded to the church.

Then the lord chamberlayn delivered openly for the solemnification of their highness’ marriage, how that the emperor had given unto his son the kingdom of Naples. So that it was thought the queen’s majesty should marry but with a prince, now it was manifested that she should marry with a king; and so proceeded to the espousals; and with a loud voice said that, if there be any man that knoweth any lawful impediment between these two parties, that they should not go together according to the contract concluded between both realmes, that then they should come forth, and they should be heard; or else to proceed to celebration of the said marriage, which was pronounced in English and Latin; and when it came to the gift of the queen it was asked who should give her. Then the marquess of Winchester, the earles of Derby, Bedford, and Pembroke, gave her highness, in the name of the whole realm.

Then all the people gave a great shout, praying God to send them joy; and, the ring being laid upon the book to be hallowed, the prince laid also upon the said book iij. hand-fulls of fine gold; which the lady Margaret [5] seeing, opened the queen’s purse, and the queen smilingly put up in the same purse. And when they had inclosed their hands, immediately the sword was advanced before the king, by the earl of Pembroke.

This done, the trumpetes sounded; and thus both returned hand in hand, the sword being borne before them, to their traverses in the quier, the queen going always on the right hand, and there remained until mass was done”

So all in all, a promising wedding today, July 25.

That’s your Tudor Minute for today. Remember you can dive deeper into life in 16th century England through the Renaissance English History Podcast at englandcast.com

Link:
Melita Thomas at the September 2017 Tudor Summit about Mary Tudor