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Tudor Minute February 1: Mary Makes a Speech

Hey, this is Heather from the Renaissance English History Podcast, and this is your Tudor Minute for February 1.

Today is the anniversary of Mary I’s speech at the Guildhall to rally her troops against Wyatt’s Rebellion. Wyatt’s rebels were advancing on London, and Mary wanted to get her people ready, and ensure that they weren’t going to help the rebels when they arrived. By all accounts, she was successful. John Proctor wrote, “She ‘did so wonderfully enamour the hearts of the hearers as it was world to hear with what shouts they exalted the honour and magnanimity of Queen Mary.” Wyatt’s rebellion was largely out of fear of what would happen if Mary married Philip of Spain.

Elizabeth I often gets more credit for her speech to the troops during the Spanish Armada, but listen to this: “I am your Queen, to whom at my coronation, when I was wedded to the realm and laws of the same (the spousal ring whereof I have on my finger, which never hitherto was, not hereafter shall be, left off), you promised your allegiance and obedience to me…. And I say to you, on the word of a Prince, I cannot tell how naturally the mother loveth the child, for I was never the mother of any; but certainly, if a Prince and Governor may as naturally and earnestly love her subjects as the mother doth love the child, then assure yourselves that I, being your lady and mistress, do as earnestly and tenderly love and favour you. And I, thus loving you, cannot but think that ye as heartily and faithfully love me; and then I doubt not but we shall give these rebels a short and speedy overthrow’.

That’s your Tudor Minute for today. Remember you can dive deeper into life in 16th century England through the Renaissance English History Podcast at englandcast.com where there are several episodes on Tudor Rebellions.